A Five-Point Plan for Growing a Grateful Child

A Five-Point Plan for Growing a Grateful Child

by John Rosemond

1. Do not give your child very much beyond basic necessities and basic comforts; in which case he will be grateful for what he does get.

The fact is that the more a child gets, the more he expects to continue getting, and the less grateful he is for anything you give him.

2. Assign your child to a daily routine of chores in and around the home, which he does not for money but simply because he is a competent member of the family.

In case I need to make this clearer: Do not pay for chores. When they are paid for, the child is likely to believe that if he doesn’t need money at some point in time,

he doesn’t have to do his chores.

3. Give your child an allowance, but in so doing, assign a certain area or area of fiscal responsibility to him. That forces him to begin budgeting and to begin developing

an appreciation for the value of a dollar. Allowances given without responsibility teach children that money grows on trees (or in dad’s wallet or mom’s purse).

4. Before every family meal, give thanks to God for all the blessings he has conferred upon

your family.

5. Do not celebrate your children such that they know they are being celebrated. Why? Because the child who is celebrated develops a prideful attitude.

In that regard, it is helpful to remember the words of Henry Ward Beecher (1813 – 1887): "A proud man is seldom a grateful man; for he never thinks he

gets as much as he deserves."

Humility goes a long way in this life.

©2014 John K. Rosemond

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