Words from a father to his daughter as she launches out into the world

Words from a father to his daughter as she launches out into the world

john-newton

Whether it’s to kindergarten or college, sending your child out into the world is an anxiety-provoking experience. Our children are exposed to all sorts of dangers in the world—physical, emotional, and spiritual. But as parents we have hope and we take courage. Our hope for our children outweighs our fears and anxieties because our hope for them is grounded in the heavenly Father who holds them in His hand. Children are a gift from God; wise parents will give them back to Him. Over and over and over again we give our children to God.

John Newton is well-known as a hymn writer, fewer are acquainted with him as a letter writer. Newton was a prolific letter writer—he wrote letters to church members, to fellow ministers, and to his wife. He also wrote letters to his adopted daughter, Betsy. The following is an excerpt from a letter he wrote to Betsy when she was 14-years old and away at school. If you need reason to hope as a parent, if you need an example of how to pray for your child, find it here.

October 15, 1782

My dear child,

Sometimes, when I consider what a world you are growing up into, and what snares and dangers young people are exposed to, with little experience to help them—I have some painful feelings for you.

The other day I was at the harbor, and saw a ship launched—she slipped easily into the water. The people on board cheered; the ship looked clean and mirthful, she was freshly painted, and her colors flying. But I looked at her with a sort of pity, “Poor ship!” I thought, “you are now in port and in safety; but before long you must go into the wild sea. Who can tell what storms you may meet with hereafter, and to what hazards you may be exposed. How weather-beaten you may be before you return to port again, or perhaps you may not return at all.”

Then my thoughts turned from the ship—to my dear Betsy. The ship seemed to be an emblem of your present state. You are now, as it were, in a safe harbor; but by and by you must launch out into the world, which may well be compared to a tempestuous sea. I could even now almost weep at the resemblance. But I take courage, as my hopes are greater than my fears. I know there is an infallible Pilot, who has the winds and the waves at His command. There is hardly a day passes, in which I do not entreat Him to take charge of you. Under His care—I know you will be safe. He can guide you, unhurt, amidst the storms, and rocks, and dangers—by which you might otherwise suffer—and bring you, at last, safely to the haven of His eternal rest.

I hope you will seek Him while you are young—then you will be happy, and I shall rejoice. Nothing will satisfy me but this. Though I should live to see you settled to the greatest advantage in temporal matters—unless you love Him, and live in His fear and favor—you would be quite miserable. I think it would nearly break my heart; for, next to your dear mamma, there is nothing so dear to me in this world as you. But the Lord gave you to me—and many a time upon my knees, I have given you back to Him. Therefore I hope you must, and will, and shall be His.

I am, with great tenderness, my dear child, your very affectionate father.

reblogged from Mike Livingstone blog

The Age-Long Minute

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE AGE-LONG MINUTE

“Thou art the Lord who slept upon the pillow
Thou art the Lord who soothed the furious sea,
What matter beating wind and tossing billow
If only we are in the boat with Thee?

Hold us in quiet through the age-long minute
While Thou art silent and the wind is shrill:
Can the boat sink while Thou, dear Lord, art in it?
Can the heart faint that waiteth on Thy will?”

-Amy Carmichael

How Can We Pray Without Ceasing if We Are Slaves To Technology?

Slaves to Technology

We are commanded in scripture to “pray without ceasing”. This simply means having a consistent attitude of prayer and communion with God. Do you think of Him often? Do you pray for people you come in contact with as you are observing them? Are you consciously thankful to God thought your day and reflect in Him? Do you spend moments where you are not distracted and commune with God? This is what I believe it means to “pray without ceasing“.

I believe the greatest hinderance to “praying without ceasing” is technology (cell phone, social media, computer use, video games). The average person now spends more time on electronic devices than sleeping! People spend an average of 8 hours 21 minutes sleeping a day – but spend an average of 8 hours 41 minutes on media devices. 88 text messages and 17 calls are made on average EACH DAY by 18-29 year olds. (Article Below)

How can you “pray without ceasing” if you are constantly connected? How can you truly be led by the Spirit of God if you are a slave to your cell phone? My friends, I’m not trying to be legalistic or self-righteous. I just want to see souls won to the Kingdom and disciples made of all nations, and you cannot be an effective soul-winner and disciple maker if technology is an idol to you. There’s a world around you dying and going to hell and you spend the best hours of your day buried in your phone and computer? Repent, trash your idols, and advance the Kingdom of God! I promise you on your death bed (if you get one) that you will not regret removing those things which “quenched and grieved” the Spirit of God’s work in your life. Remember, you are not your own, you were bought with a price!

Reblogged from: Raising Godly Children Facebook post

Average person now spends more time on their phone and laptop than SLEEPING, study claims

  • The average person spends 8 hours and 41 mins on electronic devices
  • This is 20 minutes more than the average night’s sleep, it is claimed  
  • Four in 10 smartphone users check their phone in the night if it wakes them
  • More time is spent checking emails in the morning than eating breakfast
  • Sleep experts warn constant exposure to devices is leading to poor sleep
  • Expert advises making the bedroom a ‘tech-free’ zone in order to boost rest

Many adults now spend more hours of the day using laptops and phones than they do asleep, a survey has revealed.

People spend an average of 8 hours 21 minutes sleeping a day – but spend an average of 8 hours 41 minutes on media devices.

The majority (81 per cent) of smartphone users have their phones switched on all the time, even in bed, they said.

Many adults now spend more time using laptops and phones than they do sleeping, a survey found

Many adults now spend more time using laptops and phones than they do sleeping, a survey found

And four in ten adults and teenagers said there had been occasions when they checked their smartphone in the night after it woke them up.

They also spend more time each morning checking emails and using the internet (51 per cent) than eating breakfast (18 per cent) or taking care of their appearance (32 per cent).

Experts have warned this increase in tech-tapping means that people are not getting enough quality sleep, which has a direct effect on their health.

This stops the production of the natural sleep-hormone, melanin, and keeps a person awake.

Experts have warned that over time, a continued lack of sleep can lead to a weakened immune system and an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

It can also make a person more susceptible to mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, and can impair fertility in both men and women.

Sleep experts advise turning off all technological devices at least 60-90 minutes before bed for better sleep

Dr Nerina Ramlakhan, a sleep and energy coach, advises turning off all technological devices at least 60-90 minutes before going to sleep in order to give the mind time to wind down.

Browsing the internet and social media before going to bed overloads the ‘working memory’ of the brain, leading to noisy, thought-filled sleep, she said.

She added: ‘Three quarters of people in the UK are not getting a good night’s sleep.

‘As people increase the volume of technology in their homes, there are more distractions to keep them awake at night, reducing the amount of quality sleep they receive.

A SLEEP EXPERT’S TIPS FOR A GOOD NIGHT’S REST

Dr Nerina Ramlakhan, a sleep and energy coach, says taking the following steps can lead to a restful night..

• Read a book or listen to relaxing music – choose fiction over work-related reading materials or self-help books

• Have a bath and use some relaxing essential oils such as lavender to help promote sleepiness

• Switch off tech devices and avoid checking your emails or social media accounts 90 minutes before going to bed – put you phone, laptop and tablets away.

‘Checking emails, social media channels and browsing the internet keeps the brain working, making it more difficult to finally switch off and fall asleep.’

And it’s not just adults who are at risk. A recent focus group of almost 500 students aged 13-15 held by Dr Ramlakhan showed cause for concern as an alarming number complained of sleep problems and feeling exhausted.

Of those who complained, almost 80 per cent were using electronic devices in bed.

Dr Ramlakhan said: ‘It is crucial that people recognise importance of a good night’s sleep. The health risks associated with chronic sleep debt can cause a variety of problems, leading to further illness and potential lifelong issues.’

She advises keeping the bedroom tech-free to avoid future health issues.

She said: ‘Your bedroom is one of the most important factors when it comes to getting a great night’s sleep.

‘Banishing technology from the bedroom is one of the easiest things people can do to promote a relaxing sleep environment and ensure they’re getting enough rest for the body to recover overnight.’

The research was carried out by Silentnight.

Reblogged: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2989952/How-technology-taking-lives-spend-time-phones-laptops-SLEEPING.html#ixzz3UeIL9aSr

Why? Isn’t always the best question.. or sometimes Odd is just odd!

When a problem in a child “becomes” a disorder, it is rarely, if ever, cured in a day.

When children develop problems, they need parents who are authoritative, not anxious. Anxiety and authority are incompatible. The former cancels the latter.

Anxiety reflects the now-ubiquitous tendency of parents to “think psychologically” about problems that arise in or with their kids. This sort of thinking prevents problem-solving-not sometimes, but always-because the question “Why is this happening?” prevents a parent from focusing on what to do about it. The “Why?” question induces what I call “disciplinary paralysis.”

We seem to have forgotten that children do odd things sometimes. These odd things do not necessarily indicate a problem. Sometimes, odd is nothing more than odd.

Odd is just odd

by John Rosemond

The mother of a 4-year-old boy shared an interesting story with me the other day. At age 2, her son began chewing meat to the point where it became liquid, but would not swallow. The parents became worried and began attempting various means of persuading him to swallow. Nothing worked, which increased the parents’ anxiety and, likewise, the energy they put into the swallowing project.

Finally, the mother read a book of mine in which I describe a technique I developed called “The Doctor.” It’s actually a modification of an approach to children developed by Milton Ericson, an outlier psychiatrist whose offbeat, creative work has never been given its due in the mental health community.

Full disclosure: Whenever, in this column, I have written about this technique, mental health professionals have complained that it may well cause children to be anxious about real doctors. To that, I can only say that over the perhaps 20 years that I’ve disseminated this recommendation concerning various problems involving young children, not one parent has ever reported that a child developed doctor anxiety. Furthermore, the “cure” rate of childhood fears, anxieties, and even major behavior problems has been remarkable.

The method involves simply telling the child in question that The Doctor has said that the problem, whatever it is, is due to lack of sleep. Therefore, until the problem has completely disappeared for a certain period of time, or on any day that the problem occurs, the child must go to bed immediately after the evening meal. Other privileges can also be made part of a package of consequences, but early bedtime usually does it.

Concerning the meat-chewing 4-year-old, the parents told him, “We visited with a doctor today and told him that you chew meat and won’t swallow it. He told us that this happens when a child isn’t getting enough sleep. He told us that when you chew meat and won’t swallow it, that you have to go to bed right after supper.”

That evening, the child had to go to bed right after supper. From that point on, he has chewed and swallowed, chewed and swallowed, chewed and swallowed. No problem since.

There are four points to the story, the first of which is that if the parents’ had consulted a mental health professional, there is some likelihood the child would have become afflicted with a disorder of some sort-sensory integration disorder, perhaps. When a problem becomes a disorder, it is rarely, if ever, cured in a day.

The second point is that the mother now realizes her anxiety was one reason-perhaps THE reason-why the problem worsened over a two-year period. When children develop problems, they need parents who are authoritative, not anxious. Anxiety and authority are incompatible. The former cancels the latter.

The third point is that the mother’s anxiety reflected the now-ubiquitous tendency of parents to “think psychologically” about problems that arise in or with their kids. This sort of thinking prevents problem-solving-not sometimes, but always-because the question “Why is this happening?” prevents a parent from focusing on what to do about it. The “Why?” question induces what I call “disciplinary paralysis.”

The fourth point is that we seem to have forgotten that children do odd things sometimes. These odd things do not necessarily indicate a problem. Sometimes, odd is nothing more than odd.

More of Family psychologist John Rosemond on his web site at www.rosemond.com

And thousands of Articles and Questions Answered at www.parentguru.com